New Mexico Regional Conference

We just got back on Friday after getting to TRAIN at the Regional Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.  It was great to see some returning faces from last year and to meet some new people as well.  I feel like over all the conference was great and it added an avenue for fellow Therap Guru’s to brainstorm and trouble shoot.  I feel like New Mexico is well on it’s way up in the Therap world.  The state as a whole seems to be using Therap much more that what it is mandated for.  There of course are some that have not caught on to all of it’s capabilities, but also many that have.

So, just wanted to touch base and say that we had a great time and were very honored to actually train others at the conference.  We are even talking about starting a New Mexico User Group and had several other people interested.

It was very worth it!

By |2015-06-01T22:44:39+00:00June 1st, 2015|Categories: Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on New Mexico Regional Conference

Hell Week= Surprise Week

Every year we hold an agency wide Therap training for our staff. This consists of six, roughly 12 hour, days of 1.5 hour class sessions. As you might expect by day three the instructors, myself and one other, are having nightmares about the sessions. We have been doing these trainings, whether its review or new material, for the last four years and have always had the staff logging on to Therap and following along. So, for the last three years we have had trainings where the staff stare at a computer screen while myself and the other instructor drone on and on. But not this year, this year we decided to shake things up a bit.

This year we decided not to use computers and we played Therap Jeopardy. Surprises came by the truck load. First The classes were far more engaged. Second the increased engagement fostered some absolutely fantastic discussions and Ah ha! moments. Now, Therap is a web based system, so having no computers was a concern, but in the end the result was the biggest surprise, and testament to its user friendless. Several of the questions asked staff to walk through this process or that process. My socks were blown off when staff verbally using the correct terms and everything were able to explain what we were asking. Not only that, but were able to add valuable insights from a Support Staff’s position that myself and the other instructor could not have given.

When a system works in such a way that it makes it possible to recall the process without actually looking at it speaks volumes. So, I guess in short what I am trying to say is this. For staff, that have already gone through some sort of introduction to Therap, don’t be afraid to go off grid every once and a while. It breaths new life into training and gives them a sense of pride that they really do know their stuff.

The last days…

As we enter these last days of the year a season of reflection reaches its crescendo. And, what I find is that through all the struggles and victories there are always constants. Those constants are as varied as those who rely upon them. For the purposes of this rambling I will restrict myself to the constant of Therap.

Yes, Therap has had several updates throughout the year. These updates have ranged from little changes to ones that alter how we input data. Though these changes were many they still kept with the long standing ease of use which Therap has always strived for. For that I am thankful.

The other Therap constant that I am always thankful for is the amazing Therap Team. No matter the situation the amazing team at Therap has always been patient and super excited to help solve the problem. Getting a little more personal is the amount of grace that is  extendes to a certified trainer such as myself that is struggling to uphold his end of the bargain; Being more active with blogging and webinars is actually my number one professional goal for the new year (yes I will need your help with this Allison).

Well that is it for now. Wishing all of you a Merry Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, Festivus, or just a happy winter season. Can’t wait to see ya’ll at the National Conference.

By |2016-11-03T10:15:09+00:00December 17th, 2014|Categories: Allison's Posts, Uncategorized|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on The last days…

It’s that time of year again!

 IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

July 31, 2014

Mr. Cardin (for himself, Ms. Collins, Mr. Blumenthal, Mr. Brown, Mr.
Casey, Mr. Franken, Mr. Grassley, Mr. King, Ms. Klobuchar, Mr. Manchin,
Mr. Markey, Mr. Murphy, Mr. Portman, Mr. Rockefeller, and Ms. Warren)
submitted the following resolution; which was considered and agreed to

_______________________________________________________________________

RESOLUTION

Designating the week beginning September 7, 2014, as “National Direct
Support Professionals Recognition Week”.

Whereas direct care workers, personal assistants, personal attendants, in-home
support workers, and paraprofessionals (referred to in this preamble as
“direct support professionals”) are the primary providers of publicly-
funded long-term support and services for millions of individuals with
disabilities;
Whereas direct support professionals must build a close, respectful, and trusted
relationship with individuals with disabilities;
Whereas direct support professionals assist individuals with disabilities with
intimate personal care assistance on a daily basis;
Whereas direct support professionals provide a broad range of individualized
support, including–

(1) preparation of meals;

(2) helping with medications;

(3) assisting with bathing and dressing;

(4) assisting individuals with physical disabilities with access to
their environment;

(5) providing transportation to school, work, religious, and
recreational activities; and

(6) helping with general aspects of daily living, such as financial
matters, medical appointments, and personal interests;

Whereas direct support professionals provide essential support to help keep
individuals with disabilities connected to family, friends, and
community;
Whereas direct support professionals support individuals with disabilities in
making choices that lead to meaningful, productive lives;
Whereas direct support professionals are the key to helping individuals with
disabilities to live successfully in the community, and to avoid more
costly institutional care;
Whereas the participation of direct support professionals in medical care
planning is critical to the successful transition from medical events to
post-acute care and long-term support and services;
Whereas the majority of direct support professionals are the primary financial
providers for their families and often work multiple jobs to make ends
meet;
Whereas direct support professionals are a critical element in supporting
individuals who are receiving health care services for severe chronic
health conditions and individuals with with functional limitations;
Whereas while direct support professionals work and pay taxes, many direct
support professionals earn poverty-level wages and are therefore
eligible for the same Federal and State public assistance programs on
which individuals with disabilities served by direct support
professionals must also depend;
Whereas Federal and State policies assert the right of certain individuals with
a disability to live in a residential setting in the community, or an
institutional setting of their choice, and the Supreme Court of the
United States, in Olmstead v. L.C., 527 U.S. 581 (1999), confirmed that
right for certain individuals;
Whereas, as of 2014, the majority of direct support professionals are employed
in home and community-based settings and this majority is projected to
increase over the next decade;
Whereas there is a documented and increasing critical shortage of direct support
professionals throughout the United States; and
Whereas many direct support professionals are forced to leave their jobs due to
inadequate wages and benefits and limited opportunities for advancement,
creating demonstrated high turnover and vacancy rates, which adversely
affect the quality of support and the safety and health of individuals
with disabilities: Now, therefore, be it
Resolved, That the Senate–
(1) designates the week beginning September 7, 2014, as
“National Direct Support Professionals Recognition Week”;
(2) recognizes the dedication of direct support
professionals and the vital role direct support professionals
have in enhancing the lives of individuals with disabilities of
all ages;
(3) appreciates the contribution of direct support
professionals in supporting individuals with disabilities and
their families in the United States;
(4) identifies direct support professionals as integral to
long-term support and services for individuals with
disabilities; and
(5) finds that the successful implementation of the public
policies affecting individuals with disabilities in the United
States depends on the dedication of direct support
professionals.

By |2016-11-03T10:15:11+00:00August 29th, 2014|Categories: Kristen Thompson's Posts|Tags: , , , |Comments Off on It’s that time of year again!

Hanging my head.

I have not posted in a long while, and for that I hang my head in shame. And now to add insult to injury, I am just going to pose a question.

For those agencies using skin/wound how do you get your staff to access the tracking in the same way, since there are 3 options for accessing the data?

That being asked, all is well here in the Pacific Northwest. Several of our departments are coming more online and using more pieces of Therap. The greatness of job security…I love it.

By |2014-08-14T20:48:51+00:00August 14th, 2014|Categories: Craig Buswell's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on Hanging my head.

HELP! Too Many Shared Contacts!!!

Have you ever been updating an IDF, adding an Therap appointment or adding a shared contact and think “There’s just too many!” well, this is what makes therap great. You CAN DELETE!. Now, if you just created a therap contact and realized there was another one, the best thing to do is to delete it. otherwise, when you delete a shared contact and it’s been used (such as in appointments, IDF’s etc) all that information will be Poof! Gone.

But fear not, the wonderful programmers have made their way around it. So, in order to DISCONTINUE a Shared Contact, and clean up the giant mess that shared contacts can become you must:

 

1. Have the Admin Ability assigned to you via a Super Admin in your Therap System.

2. Go to the Admin Tab on Dashboard.

3. Under General: Shared Contact: Click “List”.

This gives you the big giant list of shared contacts for your organization. Now looking at them all can all the pages can seem like they’re endless. Cleaning up your Shared Contact list is a bit tedious, but worth it in the end.

so Now that you’ve got the list, what to do?

1.  Find the Shared Contact you are no longer using and click on it.

2. At the Bottom Right corner, you’ll see 2 options.

“Update” or “delete”.

3. Click Delete. ( yes, we will discontinue it, but to get there, we have to click the Delete button :) )

4. Now therap will automatically tell you if your Shared Contact is already in use (such as any past appointments, IDF’s, etc) and where it is being used at.

For Example: If it’s an old pharmacy, it will show you all the old IDF’s it was being used in, or it is being used in (if you haven’t updated those IDF’s like you were supposed too. )

5. Now we know where the Contact is being used, on the bottom right is the Discontinue button. This is great, because it allows us to get it off the shared contact list, but still have the information available if we need it and can be found in the archives (i’ll save the archives for a later post :) )

6. You have now been transported back to the beginning and will see the long list of all your shared contacts again and at the top it will confirm that the shared contact was discontinued.

You then just repeat the process until your Shared Contact List is Short and Simple.

Hope this helps all of you out there that have a Shared Contact list longer the Pi. :)

Happy Spring Cleaning of all those Pesky unused Contacts!.

– Racheal.

 

By |2016-11-03T10:15:12+00:00May 29th, 2014|Categories: Racheal Anderson's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , |Comments Off on HELP! Too Many Shared Contacts!!!

Therap Financial module

As I’ve come to various Therap Conferences, have met my fellow trainers and spoken to various agencies I’ve discovered that everyone uses the Therap Financial Module differently. Some use it to track individual petty cash, to house petty cash to just tracking house expenses. This got me to thinking.. I want to hear everyone else’s ideas and how they use it. Below, i’ll detail out how we use Therap Financial in my houses, and how well it works.

First, We use our Therap Financials to track everything that the individual may have for financial tracking. We have quite a few individuals with our CEO as the Rep Payee. So we track all of their data in therap. From all deposits: wages, SSB, SSI, random funds, to all their expenses: Room and Board, debts, groceries, clothing purchases, etc.

We also use it to track Gift cards! For an individual who has a gift card, we can track purchases and accurately account for all the funds. We just set it up as a new checking accounts and label It with such as “walmart gift card5867” with the last 4 digits of the card number. This helps us keep track in the event that an individual may receive multiple gift cards for the same place and we can always know what was purchased.

I LOVE that we do this. I can easily see and track all expenses, the rep payee can pull reports and know that day their accounts balance without having to go into online banking. Also, I can go in and search for all items over 50.00 and be able to add them to the Personal Property list if needed as a double QA check.

For us, only DSP2’s and above have access to the financial module, as not everyone needs to be privy to the individuals personal information. It’s also great since if an individual wants to know, we can pull it up and show them. by scanning in and attaching receipts and bank statements as well, it just makes life a little easier.

 

 

Milton’s Training Tip Titillation – Tip # 2: How to “Spice Up” Therap Training

Milton NeuenschwanderEvery organization using Therap has to do it, there is no getting around it; staff must be TRAINED on how to use Therap! But what is the best way to teach new staff on how to use Therap?

As a Staff Development Coordinator, every month during company orientation I take 1-2 hours to try and teach a group of new staff on the basic elements of Therap. So I set up my computer and projector, I have the group of new staff sit in nice comfy chairs, I turn down the lights, and I start my presentation. It never fail that 30 minutes into my presentation, I have a handful of new staff laying their heads down and succumbing to the forces of boredom and sleep deprivation.

Which brings us to our next Training Tip Titillation – How to “Spice Up” Therap Training. Through my experience as a trainer, I have come across many ways on how to “spice up” training in order to arouse your participant’s interests, keep them engaged, and retain information. So the following is a selection of the best tips I have for “spicing up” Therap training.

Tip #1 – The Beginning: Arouse Interest, Set the Mood, and Create Anticipation

Good trainings will have a beginning, middle, and an end; and so we will start at the beginning. At the beginning of training you will need to get everyone’s attention and arouse their interests by making them wonder, “What’s going on here”? You will also need to set the mood right away, so that everyone feels comfortable, everyone realizes that they are in for a good time, and everyone wants to playfully cooperate. Lastly, you need to create anticipation by making them think, “this is going to be a cool training that is going to help me.” So here are the tips on how to do that…

  • Give Them Something to Do – One of the best ways of getting you audience involved in the training is by doing something together as a group. We like to call these “Icebreakers”. One of my favorite icebreakers is to take a stuffed animal and I toss it to members of the audience. Whoever catches it introduces themselves to the group and then tosses it to the next person. Quick, simple, and very involved.
  • Show an Intriguing Picture, Slide, or Video – Youalready have a computer and projector set up, so before the training starts show your participants an intriguing picture, slide, or video. Just look at the picture I posted in this blog. I guarantee that it caught your attention and you wanted to read and see how this ridiculous picture relates to training (it is a picture of me dressed up like Garth, from Wayne’s World, during a Blizzard Ball tournament in Montana)
  • “Hang Out” Before You Start – Shake hands and say, “hello” to as many audience members as you can. Even if you work with these people every day and they already know you. Spending time with your audience before you start does two things; (1) helps loosen you up – you will be more relaxed and ready to go once the meeting actually starts, (2) it shows that you care.

Tip # 2 – The Middle: Prove your Point, Use Examples, and Explain Why

The middle of your training is the “meat & bones” of your presentation. It usually is the section of your training that involves stating facts, presenting examples, and speaking technical jargon; however, if you starting flinging around too many facts, examples, or technical jargon your training can quickly turn into “nap time”. So the following are some examples of how to keep your students’ attention and make them think that what you are telling them is in their best interest.

  • Have an Agenda – all your best trainings and meetings have an agenda or outline of what the students should expect from the presentation. An agenda also keeps the trainer on task and on time. The agenda that I would recommend for Therap Training is the “T-Checklist” (Therap New User Training Checklist) which can be found by following this link:

http://support.therapservices.net/download/attachments/6260218/Therap_training_checklist_Nov_2012.pdf

  • Encourage Hands – On Experience – One of the best ways to make sure that your students don’t get bored and start to day dream during your training is to keep their hands occupied. The best way to do this for Therap training is to make sure that all participants have their own personal laptop, computer, or mobile device in front of them to follow along with the training. Furthermore, provide each trainee with a copy of the “T-checklist” so they may check off the tasks as they are complete.
  • Know Your Student’s Name and Use Their Name During Your Training – This is a very simple technique to guarantee you have someone’s attention, but it works and it is my favorite. When you start to notice that one of your staff’s focus is starting to drift away from the training; say or write their name when giving examples. I guarantee that if you use someone’s name when writing an example of a T-log (and then read what you wrote), you will immediately get that person’s attention.

Tip # 3 – The End: Wrap Up, Call to Action!

It’s almost over and the training must come to an end, but don’t end with a dud. But instead ask yourself, “What do you want your staff to do now that they have experienced this well-prepared Therap Training?” Your ending to your training should also involve a wrap up of the presentation and be a powerful motivating event. So here are some tips for ending your training:

  • Summarize – One of the easiest ways to end your Therap Training is to provide your staff with a summary of the different modules that were taught as well as the importance of using these Therap modules for documentation and communication purposes.
  • Proclaim a “Call to Action” – A fun and “cheesy” way to end a Therap Training is to have everyone raise their right hand a quote an unofficial Therap oath. For example, “I, state your name, promise to be the best Therap User I can be. This means that I will be committed to writing daily T-logs, documenting GERs when incidents occur, tracking Health issues to the best of my knowledge, and sending SComms when I have questions to be answered.” Or you can just make up your own.
  • Always End on A Positive Note – One of the positive ways in which I like to end Therap trainings is to give compliments to my students. I tell them how great of staff they are going to be now that they have been properly trained in using Therap. This makes them feel great about themselves, and hopefully feel great about the fact that they had to go through the training.

Well I hope these suggestions prove useful when thinking about how to “Spice-Up” your trainings, especially your Therap trainings. I am always interested in hearing new ways in which to make trainings better, so if you have any suggestions, please feel free to comment.

So in the words of LeVar Burton (Reading Rainbow), “you don’t have to take my word for it, “ instead go out and try these training tips yourself!

Training Therap to New Employees

Hi There again,

So for those out there that face some employees that may be, for lack of a better word, Technologically Challenged, how do you have them prove that they understand the documentation that you require on Therap? Ensuring that they have those skills and are competent to be able to write a GER, run reports on Intake/Elimination, Enter ISP Data, or even the most basics of reading SComms and T-logs? Here at CSS we have a great staff that created these wonderful  things called competencies. These competencies detail out a lot of information, everything from understanding of our policies and Mission, Vision and Values, to initial trainings on ISP’s, BSP’s, financials and an understanding of using Person First Language and Person Centered Thinking. Along with all that and many other items, it also has a wonderful page that allows you to mark off their understanding of Therap. Now for us, these are all done over a 6 month period, but it’s reviewed at the 1st, 3rd, and 6th month to ensure compliance with Oregon Administrative Rules (OAR’s) and keeps it all neat and tidy in one place.

When your out there Training Therap, how does everyone do it? Therap is so user friendly with T-Girl, Live Help, and the step by step instruction sheets, it’s a wonder someone may not “get it. ” However, there are those out there in the world of Therap that may have trouble or may not be so used to computers. How do you get them there, and prove that they can demonstrate these skills? By creating a competency!! We have a one day training that is spent with anywhere from 5-10 employees and 2 Trainers (even though I’m the only certified one :)  ) that train  the new employees on how to use Therap and what we want from them in regards to documentation. For Example: Therap’s Purpose, Accessibility,What users use therap, How to access live help/My Issues, What to do when arriving on shift with Therap, Demonstration of Access to IDF’s/EDF’s, “My Account”, T-logs, GER’s, SCOMMs, Health Tracking and Running Reports, Contacts and supports, etc. …… and ANYTHING ELSE you wish to add! It’s a great place to keep everything in one place. This way no one can state that they didn’t know how, or was never trained, or never got the help (they should be accessing LIVE HELP, if not asking).

This helps prevent any error in documentation with the excuse I didn’t know how, or no one showed me, or geesh, I never knew that!. We’ve all heard the excuses I’m sure… but with these, not only to you ensure that your staff have the knowledge, but that they can demonstrate it as well! It makes lives easier all around, by knowing, and trusting that the staff you have in place are not only confident in their abilities on Therap, but they have access to help when they need it, and your job becomes easier by having competent staff that know HOW to Document what they need to, Where they need to.

Now, for everyone out there, I would like to know how you train? Do you have an easier process? A different one? A similar one? We all have so much to offer, and now I’ll be picking your brains on all the possibilities that are out there. ….

with that… I’m off… :D

-Racheal.

 

 

By |2014-03-30T06:22:36+00:00March 30th, 2014|Categories: Racheal Anderson's Posts|Tags: , , , , , |Comments Off on Training Therap to New Employees
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