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A world without complaining…

All too often we find ourselves focusing on the negative. When negative thoughts come we often want to “vent” to others and thus are spreading the negativity. So as a challenge to our leadership, we are trying a 21 day complaint free world challenge. We wear purple bracelets to remind us not to complain. When we catch ourselves complaining, we must move the bracelet to the other wrist and our 21 days start over. This is an effort to retrain ourselves to be positive. As a QA specialist, you could say I have become quite proficient at complaining and this has been an extreme learning curve for me. It has made me more solution driven, instead of problem driven. So as a challenge to all of my readers, stop complaining… it will make your job so much easier!

By |2013-05-24T12:26:00+00:00May 24th, 2013|Categories: Kristy Dominy's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on A world without complaining…

Hey you!!!

Screenshot of Therap Conference Page for National Conference at Kansas City, Missouri, January 2014

Yes, you, right there…Yes, YOU!

Did you know that our national conference has been scheduled for 2014…um, yeah. And it is NOT in New Jersey (for all youhaters cold weather sissies critics who give me a hard time EVERY year!).

It is in Kansas City, Missouri. It is not warmer there in January but it is more central and here are some fun facts:

>Kansas City is the home to Hallmark Cards

>Ernest Hemingway completed his novel, “A Farewell to Arms” when he was there

>It is known as “The Paris of the Plains”

>Jeff Case, Michelle Saunders, Chris Johnson and Jordan Mar are there

>and now our national conference is there!!

So, this is a no-brainer.

Sign up here to attend on January 28-30, 2014. And if you are so motivated, we would {{{{{{{LOVE}}}}}}} for you to do a presentation (like all the certified smarty pants). It could be about anything…implementing Therap, ISP construction, herding caribou…If you’d like to flaunt your nerdiness, click here and have a look at what we need for your proposal.

Do it!! Free unicorns for the first twenty presenters.

Allison

 

Excited about new tech….

I’m looking forward to the new technology that is coming out soon for Therap. The GPS option to use to track location on mobile devices is going to be interesting (if not scary!) when we find out if staff are really where they say they are. I’m hoping that some major changes are going to improve the MAR soon, I know it is in the works.

By |2013-05-20T20:14:05+00:00May 20th, 2013|Categories: Kristy Dominy's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Excited about new tech….

Reports I wouldn’t live without

Those who know me know I’m a big fan of reports and all things data. I admit, I can be quite geeky. What can I say, I love trending. I love clicking a button and having data pulled, arranged, searched, refined and re-defined in an instant. My brain used to have to take on such a task with multiple charts and reams of paper that other people could easily come and mess up at any given time. I now have a lot of free space in the ol’ noggin and a little extra time to fill up with other things like reading for pleasure or playing this new game kids call “Angry Birds.” (I know it came out a while back but I have been busy filing and protecting my charts from people who’s sole purpose was to mess up my data.) Just saying thanks to the brain(s) who came up with the report library and activity tracking features.

Here is a “top ten” list of reports that are either very useful in measuring benchmarks or ones often requested by agencies with whom I work and why:


Not in Report Library but very helpful:

  • Demographic reports – good for grant writing, audits, and census. Quick glance to check if your IDF data is accurate in the system.
  • Event report (GER specific) – Reports on approved GERs can be made and fine tuned to include whatever you want including event dates, approval dates, types of events, details, review comments,etc. Great for safety committees and tracking trends across programs.
  • ISP data search – allows you to review program info and create an excel report for review prior to billing. Waiver contracted professionals can create invoices and QA can review easily.
  • Due Medications – every nurse’s and manager’s friend!  The name speaks for itself.

In Report Library:

  • Birthday lists by program : It’s simple sure, but there is one in every agency and every department wherever you go.
  • Shared contact List : Your virtual Rolodex of doctor’s, dentists and any contacts that the agency uses.
  • Individual’s shared contact report is also helpful preparing for audits where professional’s credentials need to be verified.
  • T-log read status report : Good to review with programs for accountability.
  • Password change and Password expiration: If you have password expirations set up in the system, this report will warn you when the next round of password lock outs will hit. Password expiration reports will tell you users who are not/have not been active in the system.
  • User Access reports : Very helpful to see users who are no longer working and make adjustments/audit the admin side of the system. Good for helping prep for audits. For agencies just starting in Therap, this is a good report to print and circulate to make sure all staff are assigned to the right place/individual in the system.

With these reports, as well as others, when accompanied with Activity Tracking and search features in every module, Therap has a very good and useful way of not only seeing data in the system but making it meaningful and flexible.  If you have favorites, please share by commenting. Don’t forget to add why you love it.

By |2016-11-03T10:15:29+00:00April 3rd, 2013|Categories: Shannon Crawford's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Reports I wouldn’t live without

Why Blog? (a Personal Rambling)

Why Blog? Who in the world would want to read my ramblings? Why would someone in New York or Japan care what is going in my corner of the world?  I have thought about these and many more; and have thus far been successful in avoiding the whole thing. But after some recent epiphanies (some forced) I have come to this conclusion.  In today’s culture, as “some one” mentioned in another Therap blog, information is power. In the olden days information was passed vial snail mail, books and face to face conversations. Information was gained on a personal level, So what went on in other parts of the world rarely did affect the little corner of the world we lived in. Now though information is quickly being taken out of the hands of the postman,  the librarian, and your next door neighbor; It is now globalized on the internet. Therefore if you want to not only receive, but communicate, information you have to be connected.

But, still, why blogging you ask?

The reason is that e-mail has replaced snail mail, Kindle/ e-books have replaced the library, and texting is the new face to face. Blogging is that middle ground, it is not innately personal nor is it by default public: blogging is  your punk band’s poster plastered on the side of  buildings all over the city.  It’s a personal work of art, there for the world to see, but most of the time the general public has no clue (Only the truly Awesome see it!).  So, blogging is that information that fills the gap from the time you finish reading your office email until the time you relax with friends.

In short I blog to stay relevant. I blog to stay connected. I blog because INFORMATION, in any form, whether given or received, is POWER.

So take my blogs and use the power wisely…Rambling done.Original Picture is Unavailable

By |2016-11-03T10:15:30+00:00March 27th, 2013|Categories: Craig Buswell's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Why Blog? (a Personal Rambling)

TMS Spring Cleaning

So this weekend I took an opportunity to refine our classes / courses / curricula in THERAP. Community Services has been using the Training Management System for about 4 years now. When we began using it, only a curriculum could be assigned to an employee. In addition to all of the “classes” that were listed under Curriculum, we also had a specific curriculum for every job title at the agency. As you can imagine, over time, this became quite unwieldy. Even though I use TMS daily; and am very familiar with its function, I was nervous.  CSDD employees about 850 staff. If something were to go awry, it would create a nightmare to repair. After many hours, I was able to delete all the curricula and courses, create a few new  consolidated courses that would work for a large number of employees and assign those courses to the staff. This is not to say their were not any glitches in my plan. For one, there were a handful of curricula that I was unable to  delete without reassigning the classes that comprised the curriculum. The correction for this glitch requires looking at each employees class assignment and un-assigning the surplus classes.  There were also a few group of employee’s that required a course other than the one I initially determined was the best fit. This was a simple correction. The moral of the story?  Trust the plan, but prepare for pitfalls.

By |2016-11-03T10:15:30+00:00March 25th, 2013|Categories: Joe Pendergast's Posts|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on TMS Spring Cleaning